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This was setup and is maintained by someone with a service dog. We put this together to help people who are already partnered with a service dog, or are planning to be. This site is for the service dog community.

ADA Service Dog Laws

  • All
  • Where a service dog must be allowed with no charge
  • Dog allergies
  • Inquiries Exclusions Charges and Other Specific Rules Related to Service Dogs
  • How a Service Animal is defined by the ADA
  • Air Travel with a service dog
  • Service Animals Must Be Under Control
  • Where Service Animals Are Allowed Under the ADA
  • service dogs
  • and the ADA

State service dog laws

  • Section 21-7-1

    Declaration of policy.
    It is the policy of this state to encourage and enable the blind, the visually handicapped and the otherwise physically disabled to participate fully in the social and economic life of the state and to engage in remunerative employment.

    This is as close as the state of Alabama comes to service animal law. Thus I believe the ADA Law would define the rest. As I believe it would if a state has a less strict law than the ADA

    State Web Site
  • It is the policy of the State that:
    A. No qualified individual with a disability shall be excluded, by reason of such disability, from participation in or be denied the benefits of the services, programs, or activities of a state agency, or
    Be subjected to discrimination by any such agency.
    B. No agency shall discriminate against a qualified individual with a disability because of the disability of such individual in regard to job application procedures, the hiring, advancement, or discharge of employees, employee compensation, job training, and any other term, condition, and privilege of employment.
    C. Each agency shall operate each of its services, programs, and activities so that a service, program, or activity, when viewed in its entirety, is readily accessible to and usable by individuals with disabilities.

    State Web Site
  • 11-1024. Service animals; rights of individuals with disabilities
    Any person or entity that operates a public place shall not discriminate against individuals with disabilities who use service animals if the work or tasks performed by the service animal are directly related to the individual’s disability. Work or tasks include assisting individuals who are blind or have low vision with navigation and other tasks, alerting individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to the presence of people or sounds, providing nonviolent protection or rescue work, pulling a wheelchair, assisting an individual during a seizure, alerting individuals to the presence of allergens, retrieving items such as medicine or the telephone, providing physical support and assistance with balance and stability to individuals with mobility disabilities and helping individuals with psychiatric and neurological disabilities by preventing or interrupting impulsive or destructive behaviors. The crime deterrent effects of an animal’s presence and the provision of emotional support, well-being, comfort or companionship do not constitute work or tasks.
    http://www.azleg.state.az.us/ars/11/01024.htm

    State Web Site
  • 20-14-304.
    Right to be accompanied by service animal — Penalty and restitution for killing or injuring a service animal or search and rescue dog.
    (a) Every visually handicapped, hearing impaired, or other physically disabled person shall have the right to be accompanied by a service animal especially trained to do work or to perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability in or upon any and all public ways, public places, and other public accommodations and housing accommodations prescribed in § 20-14-303 and shall not be required to pay any extra fee or charge for the service animal.
    (b) However, any visually handicapped, hearing impaired, or other physically disabled person accompanied by a service animal in any public way, public place, public accommodation, or housing accommodation shall be liable for any damage caused to the premises or facilities by the animal.
    http://humanservices.arkansas.gov/dsb/DSB%20Documents/20-14-304.doc

    State Web Site
  • AB 1252
    Sub section (7)
    The code requires a food facility to prevent the entrance and Harborage of animals and prohibits a food employee from caring for or Handling animals that may be present. The code permits a food Employee with a service animal to handle or care for the service
    Animal if the employee washes his or her hands as required. The code
    Defines a service animal to mean a guide dog, signal dog, or other
    Animal individually trained to provide assistance to an individual with a disability.
    This bill would revise the definition of a “service animal” for
    Purposes of the code to mean a dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability. The definition would specifically exclude other species of animals, as specified.
    113903. (a) “Service animal” means any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability, or that is in training to do that work or perform those tasks. “Service animal” does not include any other species of animals, whether wild or domestic, trained or untrained.
    (b) The work or tasks performed by a service animal shall include assisting individuals who are blind or have low vision with navigation and other tasks, alerting individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to the presence of people or sounds, providing nonviolent protection or rescue work, pulling a wheelchair, assisting an individual during a seizure, alerting individuals to the presence of allergens, retrieving items such as medicine or the telephone, providing physical support and assistance with balance and stability to individuals with mobility disabilities, or helping persons with psychiatric and neurological disabilities by preventing or interrupting impulsive or destructive behaviors. The crime deterrent effects of an animal’s presence and the provision of emotional support, well-being, comfort, or companionship do not constitute work or tasks for the purposes of this subdivision.

    http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/cgi-bin/waisgate?WAISdocID=47949523845+0+0+0&WAISaction=retrieve

    State Web Site
  • Colorado Law
    Under Colorado law, an individual with disabilities or a trainer of a service animal has the
    right to be accompanied by a service animal without being required to pay an extra charge:
    •in any place of employment, housing, or public accommodation;
    •during any programs, services, or activities conducted by a public entity;
    •for any public transportation service; or
    •at any other place open to the public.
    Additionally, an employer must allow an employee with a disability to keep the employee’s
    service animal with the employee at all times in
    the place of employment. An employer is
    prohibited from discriminating against an individual
    in hiring, or in respect to compensation,
    terms, conditions, or privileges of employment,
    because that individual with a disability is
    accompanied by a service animal. Finally, an individual with a disability who owns a service
    animal is exempt from any state or local licensing fees or charges that might otherwise apply in connection with owning a similar animal.
    5 Interfering with, or threatening to interfere with, the rights or privileges described above;
    punishing a person attempting to exercise such rights or privileges; or interfering with, injuring,
    or harming a service animal, or causing another dog to do the same, is a class 3 misdemeanor,
    punishable by up to six months in prison, a $750 fine, or both.
    6 Colorado law also specifies civil
    penalties for certain discriminatory practices relating to individuals with disabilities, including an award of attorney’s fees for the prevailing party in some situations.
    https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/sites/default/files/Fraudulent%20Use%20of%20Pets%20as%20Service%20Animals_031016.pdf

    State Web Site
  • Connecticut law requires public accommodations to permit people who are blind, deaf, or mobility impaired to use service dogs to help them.
    The ADA has similar provisions but covers a wider range of disabilities
    , including mental and psychiatric disabilities
    .
    Connecticut law does not require a person using a service dog to prove that the dog is being used to help with disabilities in order to be afforded the protections allowed to people using service dogs. Like other dogs, the service dog must be licensed and have a tag. If the dog has not been previously licensed, the owner must present documentation that the dog has been a appropriately trained as a service dog to get a license. The ADA likewise does not require such proof and its implementing regulations limit the types of questions that people working in the private and public facilities it covers can ask about the dog or its owner.
    https://www.cga.ct.gov/2014/rpt/pdf/2014-R-0025.pdf

    State Web Site
  • 916. Unauthorized acts against a service dog; penalties.
    (a) “Service dog” means any guide dog, signal dog, or other animal individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including, but not limited to, guiding individuals with impaired vision, alerting individuals with impaired hearing to intruders or sounds, providing minimal protection or rescue work, pulling a wheelchair, or fetching dropped items.
    (c) No person shall intentionally interfere with the use of a service dog by obstructing, intimidating or otherwise jeopardizing the safety of the user or animal. Whoever violates this subsection shall be guilty of a class B misdemeanor.
    (d) No person shall intentionally injure or disable a service dog that is being used by its owner or the officer teamed with the dog. Whoever violates this subsection shall be guilty of a class A misdemeanor.
    (e) No person shall intentionally kill a service dog owned by a private person or agency. Whoever violates this subsection shall be guilty of a class D felony. This subsection, however, does not apply to a law enforcement officer as defined by § 222 of Title 11 that is forced to take such action pursuant to the lawful performance of the officer’s duties.
    (f) No person shall intentionally steal, take or wrongfully obtain a service dog owned by a private person or agency. Whoever violates this subsection shall be guilty of a class E felony.
    (g) In any case where a person is convicted under subsection (c), (d), (e) or (f) of this section, that person shall also be ordered to make full restitution for all damages, including incidental and consequential expenses incurred by the service, guide or seeing eye dog owner and the dog which arise out of or are related to the criminal offense.
    We could find no other references to service animals is the state laws
    http://delcode.delaware.gov/sessionlaws/ga145/chp428.shtml

    State Web Site
  • The Florida law on service animals reads about the same as the ADA, with the exception of thee below prevision in the law.
    Section 9 of Title 30 Chapter 413
    A person who knowingly and willfully misrepresents herself or himself, through conduct or verbal or written notice, as using a service animal and being qualified to use a service animal or as a trainer of a service animal commits a misdemeanor of the second degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083 and must perform 30 hours of community service for an organization that serves individuals with disabilities, or for another entity or organization at the discretion of the court, to be completed in not more than 6 months.
    http://www.leg.state.fl.us/Statutes/index.cfm?App_mode=Display_Statute&Search_String=&URL=0400-0499/0413/Sections/0413.08.html

    State Web Site
  • Hawaii Revised Statutes is pretty much a copy of the ADA for people who live in Hawaii. As read in Chapter 10 Service Animals http://health.hawaii.gov/dcab/ada-coordination/state-of-hawaii-ada-resources/programs-and-services-manual/chapter-10-service-animals/ If you are traveling to Hawaii with your service animal there a few things you need to know in advance. To avoid your service dog from being put into quarantine:
    KEY POINTS FOR QUALIFYING AS A SERVICE DOG
    OR AN EXEMPTED GUIDE DOG
    • The dog must have current rabies vaccination. (Documentation of the vaccination must include the product name, the lot or serial number, and the expiration date of the lot.)
    • The dog must have an electronic microchip implanted for identification.
    • Prior to arrival the dog must have passed one OIE-FAVN test after 12 months of age, with a level of 0.5 I.U. rabies antibody or greater. The laboratory will not perform the tests unless the microchip number accompanies the test request form. A passing test result is valid for three (3) years.
    • The dog must have a standard health certificate issued not more than 30 days prior to arrival in Hawaii, attesting that the dog was treated within 14 days of arrival with a product containing Fipronil or an equivalent long-acting product labeled to kill ticks. A valid health certificate is required for each entry into Hawaii.
    • The task(s) the animal has been trained to perform should be disclosed.
    • The service dog must be traveling with the disabled user on arrival in Hawaii.
    • To prevent delays on arrival, it is strongly advised that all required documents be sent to the Rabies Quarantine Branch well ahead of your intended arrival date. Information can be mailed to the Animal Quarantine Station, 99-951 Halawa Valley Street, Aiea, HI 96701 or faxed to (808) 483-7161. Staff may be contacted by telephone (808) 483-7151 or (808) 837-8092 or e-mail: rabiesfree@hawaii.gov to assist you with preparations.
    • The Rabies Quarantine Branch must receive notification at least 24 hours in advance of arrival information and location where the dog will be staying. Information can be faxed to 808-483-7161.
    • On arrival in Hawaii, the dog must be brought by the airline to the Airport Animal Quarantine Holding Facility for verification of compliance with the above requirements and examination of the dog for external parasites. If all is in order, the dog will be released at that point.
    • Qualified Guide dog and Service dog users may request inspection in the terminal at Honolulu International Airport between the hours of 8:00 am and 4:00 pm, by notifying the Rabies Quarantine Branch 7 days, or more before arriving. To avoid confusion and delays, the airline must be notified by HDOA so that airline representatives are aware that the inspection upon arrival in Hawaii will be at the terminal rather than the Airport Animal Quarantine Holding Facility. After inspection, if all is in order, the dog will be released.
    http://hdoa.hawaii.gov/ai/aqs/animal-quarantine-information-page/guide-service-dogs-entering-hawaii/

    State Web Site
  • It seems Idaho does not have any laws on the books that we can find regarding service animals, except for:
    TITLE 49
    MOTOR VEHICLES
    CHAPTER 37
    TRANSPORTATION NETWORK COMPANY SERVICES ACT
    (3) TNC drivers shall comply with all applicable laws relating to accommodation of service animals;
    http://legislature.idaho.gov/idstat/Title49/T49CH37SECT49-3713.htm

    State Web Site
  • (720 ILCS 5/48-8)
    Sec. 48-8. Service animal access.
    (a) When a person with a physical, mental, or intellectual disability requiring the use of a service animal is accompanied by a service animal or when a trainer of a service animal is accompanied by a service animal, neither the person nor the service animal shall be denied the right of entry and use of facilities of any public place of accommodation as defined in Section 5-101 of the Illinois Human Rights Act.
    http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/documents/072000050K48-8.htm

    State Web Site
  • It is the policy of this state to encourage and enable individuals who are blind, individuals with a visual disability, and other individuals with a physical or mental disability to participate fully in the social and economic life of the state and to engage in remunerative employment.
    http://iga.in.gov/legislative/laws/2015/ic/titles/016/articles/032/chapters/003/

    State Web Site
  • 216C.1 PARTICIPATION BY PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES.
    It is the policy of this state to encourage and enable persons who
    are blind or partially blind and persons with physical disabilities
    to participate fully in the social and economic life of the state and
    to engage in remunerative employment.
    To encourage participation by persons with disabilities, it is the
    policy of this state to ensure compliance with federal requirements
    concerning persons with disabilities.
    https://coolice.legis.iowa.gov/Cool-ICE/default.asp?category=billinfo&service=IowaCode&ga=83&input=216C

    State Web Site
  • Statute 39-1101. Rights of persons with disabilities. It is hereby declared to be the policy of this state to encourage and enable the blind, the visually disabled and persons who are otherwise disabled to participate fully in the social and economic life of the state and to engage in remunerative employment. Such persons shall have the same right as the able-bodied to the full and free use of the streets, highways, sidewalks, walkways, public buildings, public facilities and other public places; and such persons are entitled to full and equal accommodations, advantages, facilities and privileges of: (a) All common carriers, airplanes, motor vehicles, railroad trains, motor buses, street cars, boats or any other public conveyances or modes of transportation; (b) hotels, lodging places and places of public accommodation, amusement or resort, including food service establishments and establishments for sale of food; and (c) other places to which the general public is invited, subject only to the conditions and limitations established by law and applicable alike to all persons.

    Statute 39-1103. Same; unlawful to interfere with rights. Any person, firm, corporation, or the agent of any person, firm or corporation, who denies or interferes with the exercise of the rights recognized in K.S.A. 39-1101, 39-1102, 39-1107, 39-1108 or 39-1109, and amendments thereto, is guilty of a misdemeanor.

    http://kslegislature.org/li_2012/b2011_12/statute/039_000_0000_chapter/039_011_0000_article/

    State Web Site
  • 258.500
    Persons with assistance dogs not to be denied accommodations,
    transportation, or elevator service

    Conditions

    Exemption from licensing fees

    Denial of emergency medical treatment for assistance dog prohibited.
    The rest reads like the federal ADA laws on service animals
    http://www.lrc.ky.gov/statutes/statute.aspx?id=12501

    State Web Site
  • RS 21:52
    52. Guide or service dog; rights and privileges of owners and trainers; penalties for violations
    A. Any blind person, visually impaired person, deaf person, hearing impaired person, or person with any other physical disability who is accompanied by a properly controlled dog which such person has been taught to use as a guide or for service at a qualified dog guide or service school, or any person who is qualified to provide training for a guide dog or service animal and is accompanied by a guide dog in training, is entitled to the full and equal accommodations, advantages, facilities, and privileges of all public accommodation, amusement, or resort, and other places to which the general public is invited, and shall be entitled to take such dog into such conveyances and places, subject only to the accommodations and limitations applicable to all persons not so accompanied, provided that the dog shall not occupy a seat in any public conveyance.
    B. Any person, firm, or corporation, or agent, representative, or employee of any person, firm, or corporation who deprives any blind person, visually impaired person, deaf person, hearing impaired person, or person with any other physical disability, or any person who is accompanied by a guide dog in training of any right conferred by Subsection A of this Section, shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof, shall be fined a sum not to exceed five hundred dollars, or be imprisoned in the parish jail for a period not to exceed ninety days, or both, within the discretion of the judge; and for every such offense such person shall forfeit and pay a sum not to exceed five hundred dollars to any person aggrieved thereby, to be recovered in any court of competent jurisdiction in the parish where such offense was committed.
    C. The provisions of Subsections A and B of this Section shall be inapplicable unless the person, as described in Subsections A and B of this Section, accompanied by a guide or service dog, shall furnish evidence as to the training of the dog, which evidence shall be obtained from the training agency or school by which the dog has been trained. If the person is accompanied by a guide dog in training as described in Subsection A of this Section, that person shall furnish evidence of his qualifications to provide training for a guide dog, or the provisions of Subsections A and B of this Section shall be inapplicable.
    http://legis.la.gov/legis/law.aspx?d=82000

    Web Client
  • I. Policy Statement.
    It is the policy of the Office of the Maine Attorney General (“Office”) to support employees with a physical or mental disability by permitting the use of Service Animals as part of a reasonable accommodation plan which has been developed in conjunction with the Office’s Equal Employment Opportunity Coordinator (“Office EEO Coordinator”) or the State’s Equal Employment Opportunity Coordinator (“State EEO Coordinator”) within the parameters set forth in this Policy. It is the policy of the Office of the Attorney General to allow Service Animals to accompany members of the public while in the office on state business and to allow access to the premises to the same extent as allowed to other members of the public. It is also the policy of the Office to permit members of the public who are especially trained service dog trainers, while engaged in the actual training process and activities of service dogs, the same rights, privileges and responsibilities as other members of the public, as provided by 17 M.R.S.A. § 1312.
    II. Definitions.
    “Service Animal” means an animal that:
    • has been determined necessary to mitigate the effects of a physical or mental disability by a physician, psychologist, physician’s assistant, nurse practitioner or licensed social worker; or
    • has been individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a physical or mental disability , including, but not limited to, guiding individuals with impaired vision, alerting individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to intruders or sounds, providing reasonable protection or rescue work, pulling a wheelchair or fetching dropped items.
    http://www.maine.gov/ag/about/service_animal_policy.html

    State Web Site
  • (g) Service animal. — “Service animal” means a guide dog, signal dog, or other animal individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including:

    (1) guiding individuals with impaired vision;

    (2) alerting individuals with impaired hearing to an intruder or sounds;

    (3) providing minimal protection or rescue work;

    (4) pulling a wheelchair;

    (5) fetching dropped items; or

    (6) detecting the onset of a seizure.
    https://web.lexisnexis.com/research/retrieve?_m=cc7b50d33f42b72c991f0ab250caee7c&docnum=11&_fmtstr=FULL&_startdoc=11&wchp=dGLzVzB-zSkAl&_md5=91337749c97c5ae2f46656a9b5618048

    Web Client
  • Section 98A. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, any blind person, or deaf or hearing handicapped person, or other physically handicapped person accompanied by a dog guide, shall be entitled to any and all accommodations, advantages, facilities and privileges of all public conveyances, public amusements and places of public accommodation, within the commonwealth, to which persons not accompanied by dogs are entitled, subject only to the conditions and limitations applicable to all persons not accompanied by dogs, and no such blind person, or deaf or hearing handicapped, or other physically handicapped person shall be required to pay any charge or fare for or on account of the transportation on any public conveyance for himself and such dog so accompanying him in addition to the charge or fare lawfully chargeable for his own transportation. Whoever deprives any blind person, or deaf or hearing handicapped person, or other physically handicapped person of any right conferred by this section shall be punished by a fine of not more than three hundred dollars and shall be liable to any person aggrieved thereby for such damages as are set forth in section five of chapter one hundred and fifty-one B; provided, however, that such civic forfeiture shall be of an amount not less than one hundred dollars.
    https://malegislature.gov/Laws/GeneralLaws/PartIV/TitleI/Chapter272/Section98A

    Web Client
  • 750.502c Public accommodation; requirements; violation as misdemeanor; definitions.
    Sec. 502c.
    (1) Except as otherwise provided in subsection (2), a public accommodation shall modify its policies, practices, and procedures to permit the use of a service animal by a person with a disability. If the service animal is a miniature horse, a public accommodation may use the following assessment factors to determine whether the miniature horse can be accommodated in its facility:
    (a) The type, size, and weight of the miniature horse and whether the facility can accommodate these features.
    (b) Whether the handler has sufficient control of the miniature horse.
    (c) Whether the miniature horse is housebroken.
    (d) Whether the miniature horse’s presence in a specific facility compromises legitimate safety requirements that are necessary for safe operation.
    (2) A public accommodation shall not ask a person with a disability to remove a service animal from the premises due to allergies or fear of the animal. A public accommodation may only ask a person with a disability to remove his or her service animal from the premises if either of the following applies:
    (a) The service animal is out of control and its handler does not take effective action to control it.
    (b) The service animal is not housebroken.
    (3) If a public accommodation properly excludes a service animal under subsection (2), it shall give the person with a disability the opportunity to obtain goods, services, or accommodations without having the service animal on the premises.
    (4) A service animal shall be under the control of its handler, and shall have a harness, leash, or other tether, unless the handler is unable because of a disability to use a harness, leash, or other tether or the use of a harness, leash, or other tether would interfere with the service animal’s safe and effective performance of work or tasks, in which case the service animal shall be otherwise under the handler’s control. As used in this subsection, “otherwise under the handler’s control” includes, but is not limited to, voice control or signals.
    (5) A public accommodation is not responsible for the care or supervision of a service animal.
    (6) If it is not obvious what service a service animal provides, staff of a public accommodation shall not ask about a person with a disability’s disability, require medical documentation, require a special identification card or training documentation for the service animal, or ask that the service animal demonstrate its ability to perform work or a task. Subject to subsection (7), staff may make the following 2 inquiries to determine whether an animal qualifies as a service animal:
    (a) Whether the service animal is required because of a disability.
    (b) What work or task the service animal has been trained to perform.
    (7) A public accommodation shall not do either of the following:
    (a) Require documentation when making an inquiry under subsection (6).
    (b) Make an inquiry under subsection (6) if it is readily apparent that the service animal is trained to do work or perform tasks for an individual with a disability.
    (8) A person with a disability shall be permitted to be accompanied by his or her service animal in all areas of a place of public accommodation where members of the public, program participants, clients, customers, patrons, or invitees are permitted to go, including public areas of establishments that sell or prepare food, even if state or local health codes prohibit animals on the premises. A public accommodation may exclude a service animal from a facility if the service animal’s presence interferes with legitimate safety requirements of the facility such as a surgery or burn unit in a hospital in which a sterile field is required.
    (9) A public accommodation shall not isolate a person with a disability accompanied by his or her service animal, treat a person with a disability accompanied by his or her service animal less favorably than other patrons, or charge a fee to a person with a disability accompanied by his or her service animal that is not charged to other patrons without service animals. A public accommodation shall not ask or require a person with a disability to pay a surcharge, regardless of whether people accompanied by pets are required to pay a surcharge, or to comply with other requirements that are not applicable to people without pets. If a public accommodation normally charges people for damage caused, the public accommodation may charge a person with a disability for damage caused by his or her service animal.
    (10) A public accommodation that violates subsections (1), (3), or (6) to (9) is guilty of a misdemeanor.
    http://www.legislature.mi.gov/%28S%28shyn20kdxz4weqlx1xdorosb%29%29/mileg.aspx?page=GetObject&objectname=mcl-750-502c

    Web Client
  • During the 2013 legislative session, the Minnesota legislature amended the Minnesota Human Rights Act (MHRA) to broaden the rights of individuals who use service animals in public establishments under the MHRA and to ensure that the MHRA was consistent with federal law, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The law goes into effect August 1, 2013.
    Businesses that serve the public must allow people with disabilities to enter with their service animal and to proceed into any area of the facility where customers are normally allowed to go. The law applies to all businesses open to the public, including restaurants, hotels, taxis, buses, grocery and department stores, hospitals and medical offices, theaters, health clubs, parks and zoos.
    Businesses may ask if an animal is a service animal or ask what tasks the animal has been trained to perform. However, businesses may not ask:
    • About the person’s disability or require documentation of the disability,
    • That special identification cards for the service animal be produced,
    • That the dog demonstrate its ability to perform work,
    • About the training that the service animal received, or
    • Require individuals with a service animal to use a specific entrance.
    Can any animal be a service animal?
    Service animals are defined as dogs that are individually trained to do work or perform tasks for people with disabilities that are directly related to the person’s disability. Service animals are working animals, not pets.
    Examples of such work or tasks include guiding people who are blind, alerting people who are deaf, pulling a wheelchair, alerting or protecting a person who is having a seizure, reminding a person with mental illness to take prescribed medications, calming a person with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) during an anxiety attack, or performing other duties.
    A dog whose sole function is to provide comfort or emotional support does not qualify as a service animal.
    http://mn.gov/mdhr/yourrights/service_animals.html

    State Web Site
  • (a) Every covenant, condition or restriction that
    purports to forbid or restrict the conveyance, encumbrance, occupancy, or lease thereof to individuals of a specified race, creed, color, sex or national origin; families with children status; individuals with any sensory, mental or physical disability; or the use of a trained guide dog or service animal by a person with a physical disability or who is blind or deaf; and
    (b) Every covenant, condition, restriction or prohibition, including a right of entry or possibility of reverter, that directly or indirectly limits the use or occupancy of rea
    l property on the basis of race, creed, color, sex, national origin; families with children status, unless the lot is part of an age restricted community under the Housing for Older Persons Act of 1995; the presence of any sensory, mental or physical disability; or the use of a trained dog guide or service animal by a person with a physical disability or who is blind or deaf.

    (2) Upon the board of directors’ receipt of a written request by a member of the association that the board exercise its amending authority granted under subsection (1) of this section, the board must, within a reasonable time, amend the governing documents, as provided under this section.

    (3) Amendments under subsection (1) of this section may be executed by any board officer. H. B. No. 720
    *HR26/R1287*
    ~ OFFICIAL ~
    16/HR26/R1287
    PAGE
    12
    (OM
    \
    KW)
    (4)
    Amendments made under subsection (1) of this section
    269
    must be recorded in the association’s records and state the
    270
    following:
    271
    “This amendment strikes from these covenants, conditions, and
    272
    restrictions those provisions that are void under Section 8 of
    273
    this
    act. Specifically, this amendment strikes:
    274
    (a) Those provisions that forbid or restrict use,
    275
    occupancy, conveyance, encumbrance or lease of real property to
    276
    individuals of a specified race, creed, color, sex or national
    277
    origin; families with children
    status; individuals with any
    278
    sensory, mental or physical disability; or individuals who use a
    279
    trained dog guide or service animal because they are blind or deaf
    280
    or have a physical disability; and
    281
    (b) Every covenant, condition, restriction or
    282
    prohibition
    , including a right of entry or possibility of
    283
    reverter, that directly or indirectly limits the use or occupancy
    284
    of real property on the basis of race, creed, color, sex, national
    285
    origin; families with children status; the presence of any
    286
    sensory, mental o
    r physical disability; or the use of a trained
    287
    dog guide or service animal by a person with a physical disability
    288
    or who is blind or deaf.”
    http://index.ls.state.ms.us/isysnative/UzpcRG9jdW1lbnRzXDIwMTZccGRmXGhiXDA3MDAtMDc5OVxoYjA3MjBpbi5wZGY=/hb0720in.pdf#xml=http://10.240.72.35/isysquery/irlb725/2/hilite

    Web Client
  • Rights of persons with visual, hearing or physical disabilities–guide, hearing or service dogs, no extra charge for–liability for actual damages.

    209.150. 1. Every person with a visual, aural or other disability including diabetes, as defined in section 213.010, shall have the same rights afforded to a person with no such disability to the full and free use of the streets, highways, sidewalks, walkways, public buildings, public facilities, and other public places.
    2. Every person with a visual, aural or other disability including diabetes, as defined in section 213.010, is entitled to full and equal accommodations, advantages, facilities, and privileges of all common carriers, airplanes, motor vehicles, railroad trains, motor buses, taxis, streetcars, boats or any other public conveyances or modes of transportation, hotels, lodging places, places of public accommodation, amusement or resort, and other places to which the general public is invited, subject only to the conditions and limitations established by law and applicable alike to all persons.
    3. Every person with a visual, aural or other disability including diabetes, as defined in section 213.010, shall have the right to be accompanied by a guide dog, hearing dog, or service dog, which is especially trained for the purpose, in any of the places listed in subsection 2 of this section without being required to pay an extra charge for the guide dog, hearing dog or service dog; provided that such person shall be liable for any damage done to the premises or facilities by such dog.
    4. As used in sections 209.150 to 209.190, the term “service dog” means any dog specifically trained to assist a person with a physical or mental disability by performing necessary tasks or doing work which the person cannot perform. Such tasks shall include, but not be limited to, pulling a wheelchair, retrieving items, carrying supplies, and search and rescue of an individual with a disability.
    http://www.moga.mo.gov/mostatutes/stathtml/20900001501.HTML

    State Web Site
  • 49-4-214. Right to be accompanied by service animal — identification for service animals in training. (1) A person with a disability has the right to be accompanied by a service animal or a service animal in training with identification complying with subsection (4) in any of the places mentioned in 49-4-211(2) without being charged extra for the service animal. The person with a disability is liable for any damage done to the property by the animal.
    (2) A person with a disability who has a service animal or who obtains a service animal is entitled to full and equal access to all housing accommodations as provided in 49-2-305 and 49-4-212. The person with a disability may not be required to pay extra compensation for the service animal but is liable for any damage done to the premises by the service animal.
    (3) A person who is training a service animal is entitled to the same rights and assumes the same responsibilities granted to a person with a disability in this section.
    (4) For the purposes of this section, a service animal in training that is a dog shall wear a leash, collar, cape, harness, or backpack that identifies in writing that the dog is a service animal in training. Other service animals in training must also be identifiable by written identification as a service animal in training. The written identification for service animals in training must be visible and legible from a distance of at least 20 feet.
    http://leg.mt.gov/bills/mca/49/4/49-4-214.htm

    State Web Site
  • 20-129
    (1)
    Any person or agent of such person who denies or interferes with admittance to or enjoyment of the public facilities enumerated in section 20-127 or otherwise interferes with the rights of a totally or partially blind, deaf or hard of hearing, or physically disabled person under section 20-127 or sections 20-131.01 to 20-131.04 is guilty of a Class III misdemeanor.
    (2)
    Any person or agent of such person who denies or interferes with admittance to or enjoyment of the public facilities enumerated in section 20-127 or otherwise interferes with the rights of a bona fide trainer of a dog guide, hearing dog, or service dog animal when training such dog animal under section 20-127 is guilty of a Class III misdemeanor.
    http://nebraskalegislature.gov/FloorDocs/100/PDF/Slip/LB806.pdf

  • NRS 426.097  “Service animal” defined.  “Service animal” means an animal that has been trained to assist or accommodate a person with a disability.
    https://www.leg.state.nv.us/nrs/NRS-426.html#NRS426Sec031

    State Web Site
  • New Hampshire does not have a law on the books with regard to service animals. They must just follow the ADA law without putting one of their own down, as far as we can see.

    State Web Site
  • New Jersey does not have a law on the books with regards to service animals. They just follow the ADA law without putting one of their own down, as far as we can see.
    http://www.newjersey.gov/humanservices/home/ada.html

    State Web Site
  • SECTION 2. Section 28-11-2 NMSA 1978 (being Laws 1989, Chapter 242, Section 1, as amended) is amended to read:
    “28-11-2. DEFINITIONS.–As used in the [Assistance] Service Animal Act:
    A. “emotional support animal”, “comfort animal” or “therapy animal” means an animal selected to accompany an individual with a disability that does not work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability and does not accompany at all times an individual with a disability;
    B. “qualified [assistance] service animal” means any [assistance] qualified service dog or [other animal] qualified service miniature horse that has been or is being trained to provide assistance to an individual with a disability [and includes:
    A. an assistance dog that has been or is being trained, as a guide dog, hearing dog or service dog;
    B. a guide dog that has been or is being trained to aid a blind or visually impaired person;
    C. a hearing dog that has been or is being trained to aid a deaf or hearing-impaired person; and
    D. a service dog that has been or is being trained to aid a person with a disability other than a sight or hearing impairment]; but “qualified service animal” does not include a pet, an emotional support animal, a comfort animal or a therapy animal;
    C. “qualified service dog” means a dog that has been trained or is being trained to work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities; and
    D. “qualified service miniature horse” means a miniature horse that has been trained or is being trained to work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities.”
    http://www.nmlegis.gov/sessions/13%20Regular/bills/senate/SB0320.html

    State Web Site
  • Definitions of Service Animals
    • The U.S. Department of Justice defines any guide dog, signal dog, or other animal individually trained to provide assistance to an individual with a disability. If the animal meets this definition, it is considered a service animal under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) regardless of whether it has been licensed or certified by a state or local government.
    • New York State Agriculture and Markets Article 7 section 108 defines the following:
    9. “Guide dog” means any dog that is trained to aid a person who is blind and is actually used for such purpose, or any dog owned by a recognized guide dog training center located within the state during the period such dog is being trained or bred for such purpose.
    22. “Service dog” means any dog that has been or is being individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of a person with a disability, provided that the dog is or will be owned by such person or that person’s parent, guardian or other legal representative.
    23. “Person with a disability” means any person with a disability as that term is defined in subdivision twenty-one of section two hundred ninety-two of the executive law.
    http://www.health.ny.gov/professionals/ems/policy/07-01.htm

    State Web Site
  • SECTION 47-3-920
    4) “Service animal” means an animal that is trained for the purposes of assisting or accommodating the sensory, mental, or physical disability of a disabled person.
    http://www.scstatehouse.gov/code/t47c003.php

    State Web Site
  • CHAPTER 25-13
    BLIND AND DISABLED PERSONS’ ACTIVITIES
    25-13-01. Legislative policy.
    It is the policy of this state to encourage and enable the blind, the visually handicapped, and the otherwise physically disabled to participate fully in the social and economic life of the state and to engage in remunerative employment.
    25-13-01.1. Definitions.
    For purposes of this chapter “service animal” means any guide dog, signal dog, or other animal trained to do work, perform tasks, or provide assistance for the benefit of an individual with a disability. The term includes an animal trained to provide assistance or protection services to an individual with a disability, pull a wheelchair, lend balance support, retrieve dropped objects, or provide assistance in a medical crisis.
    25-13-02. Individual with a disability
    -Service animal-
    Admission to public places.
    An individual with a disability is entitled to be accompanied by a service animal in places of public accommodations, common carriers, facilities of a health care provider, and all places to which the public is generally invited, without being required to pay an extra charge for the animal; provided, that the individual is liable for any damage done to the premises or facility by the animal.
    http://www.legis.nd.gov/cencode/t25c13.pdf?20160403002653

    State Web Site
  • “Assistance dog” means a guide dog, hearing dog, or service dog that has been trained by a nonprofit special agency
    A) When an application is made for registration of an assistance dog and the owner can show proof by certificate or other means that the dog is an assistance dog, the owner of the dog shall be exempt from any fee for the registration. Registration for an assistance dog shall be permanent and not subject to annual renewal so long as the dog is an assistance dog. Certificates and tags stamped “Ohio Assistance Dog-Permanent Registration,” with registration number, shall be issued upon registration of such a dog. Any certificate and tag stamped “Ohio Guide Dog-Permanent Registration” or “Ohio Hearing Dog-Permanent Registration,” with registration number, that was issued for a dog in accordance with this section as it existed prior to July 4, 1984, any certificate and tag stamped “Ohio Handicapped Assistance Dog-Permanent Registration,” with registration number, that was issued for a dog in accordance with this section as it existed on and after July 5, 1984, but prior to November 26, 2004, and any certificate and tag stamped “Ohio Service Dog-Permanent Registration,” with registration number, that was issued for a dog in accordance with this section as it existed on and after November 26, 2004, but prior to June 30, 2006, shall remain in effect as valid proof of the registration of the dog on and after November 26, 2004. Duplicate certificates and tags for a dog registered in accordance with this section, upon proper proof of loss, shall be issued and no fee required. Each duplicate certificate and tag that is issued shall be stamped “Ohio Assistance Dog-Permanent Registration.”
    http://codes.ohio.gov/orc/955.011

    State Web Site
  • Oklahoma seems to have the same law on their books as the ADA as seen here.
    http://ok.gov/odc/A.D.A/index.html

    State Web Site
  • “Service animal” means an animal that assists or performs tasks for a person with a sensory, emotional, mental or physical disability.
    https://www.oregonlegislature.gov/bills_laws/lawsstatutes/2007orLaw0098.html

    State Web Site
  • Pennsylvania does seem to have any specific law on the books that we can find regarding services animals. They do mention them in other parts, such as the emergency supply kit section in the link below.
    http://www.pema.pa.gov/planningandpreparedness/readypa/Pages/Pets,-Service-Animals-and-Livestock.aspx#.VwGVPkdHQqI

    State Web Site
  • Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, a service animal means any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability. Other species of animal, whether wild or domestic, trained or untrained, are not service animals for the purposes of the ADA;
    http://www.gcd.ri.gov/play/history.php

    State Web Site
  • Service animal canine’ means an animal that is trained for the purposes of assisting or accommodating the sensory, mental, or physical disability of a disabled person a canine that is specially trained or equipped to help a person with a disability. An animal that provides only comfort or emotional support to a person is not a service animal pursuant to this article. The tasks that a service animal may perform in order to help a person with a disability must be directly related to the person’s disability and may include, but are not limited to:
    (a) guiding a person who has a visual impairment;
    (b) alerting a person who has a hearing impairment or who is deaf;
    (c) pulling a wheelchair;
    (d) alerting and protecting a person who has a seizure disorder;
    (e) reminding a person who has a mental illness to take prescribed medication; and
    (f) calming a person who has post-traumatic stress disorder.”
    http://www.scstatehouse.gov/query.php?search=DOC&searchtext=service%20animal&category=LEGISLATION&session=121&conid=8160224&result_pos=0&keyval=1213051&numrows=10

    State Web Site
  • Service animals are animals specially trained to perform tasks for people with disabilities. This may include such tasks as:
    • Guiding people who are blind
    • Alerting people who are deaf
    • Pulling wheelchairs
    • Alerting and protecting a person who is having a seizure
    Businesses that serve the public must allow people with disabilities to enter with their service animal. Service animals are working animals, not pets.
    Under South Dakota’s human rights laws, as well as the federal Americans with Disabilities Act, businesses and organizations serving the public must allow people with disabilities to bring their service animals into all areas of their facility where customers are normally allowed to go. This law applies to all businesses open to the public, including (but not limited to):
    • Restaurants
    • Hotels and motels
    • Taxis and shuttles
    • Grocery and department stores
    • Hospitals and medical offices
    • Theaters
    • Health clubs
    • Parks and zoos
    http://dlr.sd.gov/humanrights/service_animals.aspx

    State Web Site
  • This is the best we could find. It was found on the lexis nexis site as seen in the link below.
    (1) As used in this section, “service animal” means:

    (A) Any animal that is individually trained, or being trained by an employee or puppy raiser from a recognized training agency or school to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability; and

    (B) Any police dog, fire dog, search and rescue dog, or police horse.

    (2) Other species of animals not specified in this subsection (a), whether wild or domestic, trained or untrained, are not service animals for the purposes of this definition.

    (3) For purposes of a service animal as defined under subdivision (a)(1)(A), the work or tasks performed by the service animal must be directly related to the handler’s disability. Examples of work or tasks include, but are not limited to, assisting individuals who are blind or have low vision with navigation and other tasks, alerting individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to the presence of people or sounds, providing nonviolent protection or rescue work, pulling a wheelchair, assisting an individual during a seizure, alerting individuals to the presence of allergens, retrieving items such as medicine or the telephone, providing physical support and assistance with balance and stability to individuals with mobility disabilities, and helping persons with psychiatric and neurological disabilities by preventing or interrupting impulsive or destructive behaviors. The crime deterrent effects of the animal’s presence and the provision of emotional support, well-being, comfort, or companionship do not constitute work or tasks for the purposes of subdivision (a)(1)(A).
    https://web.lexisnexis.com/research/retrieve?_m=57dab38b62509eff9561e9a613ae3d20&docnum=2&_fmtstr=FULL&_startdoc=1&wchp=dGLbVzk-zSkAl&_md5=06f57f555164362a521df24bd5229b42

    Web Client
  • Assistance animal’s or service animals in Texas law is heavily mentioned in the landlord Tennent section as shown in the link below. But finding it in other sections of Texas law, well………
    https://www.elpasotexas.gov/~/media/files/coep/community%20and%20human%20development/support%20for%20animals%20-%20english.ashx?la=en

    State Web Site
  • H.B. 194 of the Utah state law reads in part
    (e) “Service animal” means:
    129 (i) (A) a guide dog;
    130 (B) a signal dog; or
    131 (C) any other animal individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of
    132 a person with a disability, including:
    133 (I) guiding a person with impaired vision;
    134 (II) alerting a person with impaired hearing to intruders or sounds;
    135 (III) providing minimal protection or rescue work;
    136 (IV) pulling a wheelchair, or
    137 (V) fetching dropped items;
    138 (ii) an emotional support animal; or
    139 (iii) an animal in training to become an animal described in Subsection (1)(e)(i) or (ii).
    140 (2) (a) A person with a disability has the right to be accompanied by a [guide or]
    141 service animal, as defined by the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, 42 U.S.C. 12102,
    142 specially trained for that purpose,]:
    http://le.utah.gov/~2006/bills/static/hb0194.html

    State Web Site
  • Vermont law Title 09 chapter 139 section 4502
    (a) An owner or operator of a place of public accommodation or an agent or employee of such owner or operator shall not, because of the race, creed, color, national origin, marital status, sex, sexual orientation, or gender identity of any person, refuse, withhold from, or deny to that person any of the accommodations, advantages, facilities, and privileges of the place of public accommodation.
    (b) An owner or operator of a place of public accommodation or his or her employee or agent shall not prohibit from entering a place of public accommodation:
    (1) an individual with a disability accompanied by a service animal; or
    (2) an individual who is training an animal to perform as a service animal for an individual with a disability
    http://legislature.vermont.gov/statutes/section/09/139/04502

    State Web Site
  • 2VAC5-585-3310. Prohibiting animals.*
    3. In areas that are not used for food preparation and that are usually open for customers, such as dining and sales areas, service animals that are controlled by the disabled employee or person, if a health or safety hazard will not result from the presence or activities of the service animal;
    http://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp504.exe?000+reh+2VAC5-585-3310+700009
    12VAC5-421-10. Definitions.
    “Service animal” means an animal such as a guide dog, signal dog, or other animal individually trained to provide assistance to an individual with a disability.
    http://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp504.exe?000+reg+12VAC5-421-10

    State Web Site
  • RCW 49.60.218
    Use of dog guide or service animal—Unfair practice—Definitions.
    (1) It shall be an unfair practice for any person or the person’s agent or employee to commit an act which directly or indirectly results in any distinction, restriction, or discrimination, or the requiring of any person to pay a larger sum than the uniform rates charged other persons, or the refusing or withholding from any person the admission, patronage, custom, presence, frequenting, dwelling, staying, or lodging in any food establishment, except for conditions and limitations established by law and applicable to all persons, on the basis of the use of a dog guide or service animal by a person with a disability: PROVIDED, That this section shall not be construed to require structural changes, modifications, or additions to make any place accessible to a person with a disability except as otherwise required by law: PROVIDED, That behavior or actions constituting a risk to property or other persons can be grounds for refusal and shall not constitute an unfair practice.
    (2) A food establishment shall make reasonable modifications in policies, practices, or procedures to permit the use of a miniature horse by an individual with a disability in accordance with subsection (1) of this section if the miniature horse has been individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of the individual with a disability. In determining whether reasonable modifications in policies, practices, or procedures can be made to allow a miniature horse into a facility, a food establishment shall act in accordance with all applicable laws and regulations.
    (3) For the purposes of this section:
    (a) “Service animal” means any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability. Except as provided in subsection (2) of this section, other species of animals, whether wild or domestic, trained or untrained, are not service animals. The work or tasks performed by a service animal must be directly related to the individual’s disability. Examples of work or tasks include, but are not limited to, assisting individuals who are blind or have low vision with navigation and other tasks, alerting individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to the presence of people or sounds, providing nonviolent protection or rescue work, pulling a wheelchair, assisting an individual during a seizure, alerting individuals to the presence of allergens, retrieving items such as medicine or the telephone, providing physical support and assistance with balance and stability to individuals with mobility disabilities, and helping persons with psychiatric and neurological disabilities by preventing or interrupting impulsive or destructive behaviors. The crime deterrent effects of an animal’s presence and the provision of emotional support, well-being, comfort, or companionship do not constitute work or tasks.
    (b) “Food establishment” means a place of business that sells or serves food for human consumption with a North American industry classification system code within “445110,” “445120,” “445210,” “445220,” “445230,” “445291,” “445292,” “445299,” “452910,” “722110,” “722211,” “722212,” “722213,” or “722410.”
    WAC 162-38-100
    Persons with dog guides or service animals.
    (1) Are protected. RCW 49.60.222 protects persons with disabilities from discrimination because of their use of a trained dog guide or service animal the same as it protects them from discrimination directly because of disability.
    (2) General rule. The same rules that apply to the treatment of persons because of disability under RCW 49.60.222 and this chapter apply to the treatment of persons with disabilities because they use a trained dog guide or service animal.
    (3) Landlord’s duty. It is an unfair practice for a landlord to refuse to rent to a person with a disability because the person uses a trained dog guide or service animal. A landlord’s no-pet policy cannot be applied to the dog guide or service animal of a person with a disability.
    (4) Cleaning or damage deposits not unfair. It is not an unfair practice for a landlord to enforce on a tenant with a disability using a dog guide or service animal its standard cleaning or damage deposit if the same cleaning or damage deposit is enforced equally on all tenants.
    (5) Pet deposits unfair. It is an unfair practice for a landlord to enforce on a tenant with a disability using a dog guide or service animal a pet deposit in addition to any standard cleaning or damage deposit.
    http://apps.leg.wa.gov/wac/default.aspx?cite=162-38-100

    State Web Site
  • 5-15-3. Definitions.
    For the purpose of this article:
    (a) A “person who is blind” means a person whose central visual acuity does not exceed twenty/two hundred in the better eye with correcting lenses, or whose visual acuity is greater than twenty/two hundred but is occasioned by a limitation in the fields of vision such that the widest diameter of the visual field subtends an angle no greater than twenty degrees.
    (b) A “person with a disability” means any person who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more of the major life activities of the individual; who has a record of such an impairment or who is regarded as having such an impairment.
    (c) A “service animal” means any guide dog, signal dog or other animal individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including, but not limited to, guiding individuals with impaired vision, alerting individuals with impaired hearing to intruders or sounds, providing minimal protection or rescue work, pulling a wheelchair or fetching dropped items.
    http://www.legis.state.wv.us/legisdocs/code/05/WVC%20%205%20%20-%2015%20%20-%20%20%203%20%20.htm

    State Web Site
  • Wisconsin. Act 353 makes it a crime to harass a service dog and provides penalties.
    Act 354 amends the Wisconsin public accommodations law to conform to the federal Americans with Disabilities Act and provide for the full and equal enjoyment of places of public accommodation by persons using or training service animals.
    http://cdm16831.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/pageflip/collection/p16831coll2/id/1351/type/singleitem/pftype/pdf

    State Web Site
  • Section 1. W.S. 35-13-205 is created to read:
    35-13-205. Definitions.
    (a) As used in this article:
    “Service dog” means a dog which has been or is being specially trained to the requirements of a person with a disability;
    (ii) “Person with a disability” means an individual who has a mental or physical impairment which substantially limits one (1) or more major life activities;
    (iii) “Major life activities” means functions associated with the normal activities of independent daily living such as caring for one’s self, performing manual tasks, walking, seeing, hearing or speaking.
    Section 2. W.S. 35-13-201(a) (intro), (iii) and (b), 35-13-203 and 35-13-204(a) are amended to read:
    35-13-201.Generally; use of certified service dogs.
    (a) Any blind, visually handicapped, deaf, hearing
    20 impaired person or otherwise disabled other person with a
    21 disability, subject to the conditions and limitations
    22 established by law and applicable alike to all persons:
    https://legisweb.state.wy.us/2001/introduced/SF0004.htm

    State Web Site

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